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Course Description Guide

Course Descriptions

Language Arts Graduation Requirement

  • 4.0 credits (8 semesters)

Required Classes

  • Introduction to Literature & Composition 9  
  • World Literature & Composition 10 
  • American Literature & Composition 11, Ethnic Studies Lit and Comp, African, Asian, Latin, or Native American Lit & Comp, AP Literature, IB Lang & Lit 11, or CIHS English  
  • Comparative Literature & Comp 12, AP Language, IB Lang 12, or CIHS English

English Language Arts Modified A/B (IEP only)

  • SPS Course Number: HLA9301-HLA9307
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Consultation with Case Manager
  • Homework: As Needed

English Language Arts Modified focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content, and materials from the general education curriculum. The purposes of the course are to improve literal and inferential comprehension skills, vocabulary, reading rate, reading related study skills, and interest in reading. Curriculum is based on students’ IEP goals and objectives as well as modified general education curriculum and content.  By IEP case manager assignment only.

Intro to Literature & Composition A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HLA3093/HLA3095
  • 1 Credit/1 Year – Grade 9
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week/as needed

This course concentrates on critical reading of texts from different genres, reflecting themes of identity and self-discovery, and on clear and purposeful writing aligned to the Design Thinking process. Course topics and texts are aligned to the “Origins, Identity, and Agency” domain of the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

World Literature & Composition A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HLA3097/HLA3099
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week/as needed

This class concentrates on how the human experience is expressed in literature from around the world. Students learn to read analytically and write clearly and purposefully. Course topics and texts are aligned to the “Power and Oppression” domain of the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

American Literature & Composition 11 A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HLA2494/HLA2495
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week / as needed

American Literature & Composition continues to emphasize writing, discussion, and literary analysis. The literary emphasis is on the work of American authors, with texts selected based on input from students. Course outcomes include developing critical reading skills, communication skills, and various modes of writing. Course topics and texts are aligned to the “Resistance and Liberation” domain of the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

Comparative Literature & Composition 12 A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HLA3123/HLA3124
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 12
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week / as needed

Comparative Literature & Composition synthesizes critical reading and writing skills from previous years, focusing on texts that cross a wide range of genres, and embody a high level of thematic and technical complexity. The course prepares students to grapple with the rigors of
comparative analysis they will encounter in college. Readings, both classical and
contemporary, fiction and non-fiction, represent a diverse range of authentic voices and
showcase an assortment of themes. They are also sufficiently complex to lend themselves
to literary analysis. The texts allow students to build on critical interpretive skills
they have encountered in previous years of study. At the conclusion of the course
students analyze literature in depth, allowing them critical perspective with which to
examine complex texts beyond high school.

AP English Language & Composition 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HLA2492/HLA2493
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week / as needed

This course is designed to bring students to independence in their learning through student centered discussion and study. Course work focuses on diction, presentation, and construction of ideas, and writing about concepts, all elements of AP preparatory work emphasizing Language and Composition. The strategies for “timed writings” are established during this course. This course is strongly recommended to any student considering taking AP English Literature and Composition. The AP designation will be added to the student’s final transcript. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

AP English Language & Composition 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HLA2492/HLA2493
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Suggested Fees:  Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Homework: 5-7 hours per week

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition is a college-level course offered in high school. The course prepares students for the AP Lit exam through timed writes, practice tests, and in-class workshops and lectures. A deeper goal for students is to foster and develop a lifelong love of reading, discussing, and writing about literature. Course texts include works from major historical literary periods and works by living authors, including novels, short prose pieces, poems, and plays. Succeeding in AP Literature requires hard work, strong time management skills, active participation, and open-mindedness to new and abstract ways of reading.

AP English Literature & Composition 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HLA2494/HLA2495
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 12
  • Suggested Fees:  Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Homework: 5-7 hours per week

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition is a college-level course offered in high school. The course objective is to enable students to write effectively and confidently in their college courses across the curriculum. Therefore, this composition course emphasizes the expository, analytical, and argumentative writing that forms the basis of academic and professional communication, as well as the personal and reflective writing that fosters the development of writing facility in any context. In addition, this course will focus on skills necessary to read primary and secondary sources carefully, to synthesize material from these texts in their own compositions, and to cite sources using conventions recommended by
professional organizations.

ELL Intro to Literature & Composition 9 A/B ML (Multilingual Learners Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HLA5559/HLA5560
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week

This multilevel course concentrates on critical reading of texts from different genres, reflecting themes of identity and self-discovery, and on clear and purposeful writing aligned to the Design Thinking process. Course topics and texts are aligned to the “Origins, Identity, and Agency” domain of the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

ELL World Literature & Composition 10 A/B ML (Multilingual Learners Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HLA5567/HLA5568
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week

This multilevel course concentrates on how the human experience is expressed in literature from around the world. Students learn to read analytically and write clearly and purposefully. Course topics and texts are aligned to the “Power and Oppression” domain of the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

ELL American Literature & Composition 11 A/B ML (Multilingual Learners Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HLA5575/HLA5576
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week

This multilevel course concentrates on critical readings about the American experience with an emphasis on increased sophistication through reading, writing and speaking.

ELD 3 A/B Adjunct (Multilingual Learners Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HLA7988
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 12
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week

This multilevel course concentrates

The main objective of this course is to provide additional language support for students
who are taking a mainstream language arts class. Students will receive additional
practice and support in reading and analyzing grade level texts, writing expository,
argumentative and analytical paragraphs and essays, enhancing their oral proficiency
skills and developing academic vocabulary needed for success in the mainstream
classroom. Students will also receive targeted grammar support on an as needed basis.

ELD LA 12 A/B (Multilingual Learners Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HLA7988
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 12
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week

This course is designed to focus on strengthening the skills required for successful
completion of senior projects and post-secondary level work. Scaffolding instruction for
English Language Learners, it will review and reinforce the writing process, including
choosing and limiting a topic, writing a thesis statement, planning an outline, and
gathering, analyzing, and organizing information for a research paper. This course involves improvement of oral presentation skills, writing multi-paragraph essays, completing college applications, and resume writing. Students will also read and respond to adapted versions of grade-level appropriate literature, excerpts from grade-level literature, or entire grade-level texts.

College Prep Literacy

  • SPS Course Number: HLA2305/HLA2306
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9-12
  • Homework: As needed

This course is designed is designed to enable high school students to sharpen academic reading and writing skills in preparation for college, career, and life. This course will focus on improving reading comprehension through skill development, increasing understanding of narrative and expository text structures, including academic reading, functional reading, informational reading and technical reading, in order to learn more effectively from subject-matter textbooks in Science, History/Social Studies, Math and English. Students will be introduced to narrative and expository organizational patterns, as well as the academic language used, and the integration of reading and writing in the aforementioned classes. Frequent progress monitoring is implemented to ensure growth and acceleration. Content covered in this course is based upon student needs, and teachers select the appropriate materials. Considered a general elective, does NOT count toward ELA graduation requirement.

Annual Staff

  • SPS Course Number: HLA0219
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10-12
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week

This course emphasizes publication techniques of selecting and editing both written and pictorial copy. It provides experiences in writing captions and headings. Stress is placed on group discussion, organizing and the basic essential skills of book production of a yearbook. Considered a general elective, does NOT count toward ELA graduation requirement.

Social Studies Graduation Requirement

  • 3.0 credits (6 semesters)

Required Courses

  • World History 1 or Ethnic Studies WH 1 
  • World History 2, Ethnic Studies WH 2, AP World History 1, or AP Human Geo A 
  • World History 3, AP World History 2, or AP Human Geo B 
  • U.S. History, or Ethnic Studies US History, IB History of the Americas, AP US History, CIHS AES 151, or CIHS 147 & 148 
  • American Government, IB 20th Century, AP American Government or AP US Government & Politics 
  • Washington State History (requirement usually met in middle school)

Note: Students must also complete an OSPI developed classroom-based assessment in civics in the eleventh or twelfth grade. The World History 2 or 3 or AP Human Geography courses will satisfy the state requirements for .5 credit in Current World Problems (CWP). The American Government course will satisfy the state requirement for a .5 credit in Civics.  Since Time Immemorial Tribal Curriculum is part of the social studies course curriculum. RCW 28A.230.093 WAC 392-410-120 WAC 180-51-067 RCW 28A.320.170

World History 1 & 2 Honors

  • SPS Course Number: HSS1282/HSS1283
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9 (Required), 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: 2-3 hours/week as needed

Students will focus on civilizations and empires from the Post-Classical Era (600 to 1440 CE) and make connections to the modern world.  This class is structured around developing historical thinking skills as a basis for becoming a well-informed global citizen with highly developed critical thinking skills. The class will base its topics and learning objectives on the SPS Ethnic Studies Framework.

World History 1, 2, and 3 Modified ( IEP Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HSS9337/HSS9327/HSS9328
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Consultation with Case Manager
  • Homework: As Needed

World History Modified focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content, and materials from the general education curriculum. The purposes of the course are to improve literal and inferential comprehension skills, vocabulary, reading rate, reading related study skills, and interest in reading. Curriculum is based on students’ IEP goals and objectives as well as modified general education curriculum and content.  By IEP case manager assignment only.

World History 3 Ethnic Studies

  • SPS Course Number: HSS2577
  • 0.5 Credit/1 Semester – Grade 10, (required 10 or AP Human Geo), 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: Weekly Averages, 1-2 hours

Ethnic Studies World History 3 is the third semester of three semester length sequenced World History courses that investigates the histories of world cultures and nations that we recognize today. Specifically, students will be investigating contemporary global conflicts and politics and their consequences in the twenty-first century and the global economy, society, and culture in the twenty-first century.

AP Human Geography

  • SPS Course Number: HSS2288
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10 (meets WH2/WH3 requirement for 10th grade)
  • Suggested Fees: Payment for AP exam, workbooks ($30), test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Homework: Daily, 60 Minutes

AP Human Geography Integrated is a yearlong college level introductory course that integrates the study of human, cultural, economic and political geography. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface.  The goal for the course is for students to become more geoliterate, more engaged in contemporary global issues, and more informed about multicultural viewpoints.

US History A/B “Ethnic Studies”

  • SPS Course Number: HSS2578/HSS2579
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Course Fees: Covered by universal supply fee
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Weekly Averages, 60-120 minutes

This course is designed to investigate self and society through the lens of Ethnic Studies. We will engage in problem-posing learning and critical inquiry to take ownership of our own narratives and to understand and respond to injustice in a variety of ways. The course explores four main areas of study: Identity, Power and Oppression, Liberation and Resistance, Action and Reflection. We will integrate the arts and center marginalized histories, voices, literature and current events including climate in/justice to explore solutions in a changing world.

US History 11 Modified ( IEP Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HSS9341/HSS9335
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Consultation with Case Manager
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

US History 11 Modified focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content, and materials from the general education curriculum. The purposes of the course are to improve literal and inferential comprehension skills, vocabulary, reading rate, reading related study skills, and interest in reading. Curriculum is based on students’ IEP goals and objectives as well as modified general education curriculum and content.  By IEP case manager assignment only.

AP US History A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HSS1211/HSS1213
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 11
  • Prerequisite: Demonstrated success in social studies and English courses.
  • Suggested Fees:  Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Homework: Daily, 60 Minutes

The scope of this class is extensive and covers discovery and exploration through current American policies and events. The depth of information will be the focus, as opposed to breadth of information, as in years’ past. Instruction strategies will include skill development in notetaking, test preparation, essay writing, research skills, and analysis of different interpretations of historical, political and social events and themes. Independent reading, study and following current events is expected. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.

American Government & Econ

  • SPS Course Number: HSS0487
  • 0.5 Credit/1 Semester Grade 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: Daily, 60 minutes

American government is a course which deals with the the essence of the very system which we, the people,, follow as our means of rule. This course is taught from a topical approach with numerous topics under considerations during a given semester. Samples of the topics are power. society, judicial system, executive concepts, political parties, taxation, and the electoral college. Manu other topics are also considered and students are regularly involved in many participating activities which closely depict the actual problems and realizations of the American system of government.

American Government Modified ( IEP Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HSS9342
  • ,5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 12
  • Prerequisite: Consultation with Case Manager
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: As Needed

American Government Modified focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content, and materials from the general education curriculum. The purposes of the course are to improve literal and inferential comprehension skills, vocabulary, reading rate, reading related study skills, and interest in reading. Curriculum is based on students’ IEP goals and objectives as well as modified general education curriculum and content.  By IEP case manager assignment only.

AP U.S. Government & Politics 1&2

  • SPS Course Number: HSS7155/HSS7156
  • 1 Credit /.5 per semester – Grade 12
  • Suggested Fees:  Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Homework: Daily, 60 Minutes

.5 credit per semester Prerequisite: AP Government is intended to match the intensity of an introductory college Government class. All of the readings are at the college level and the class moves very quickly. Average homework: AP Government will require about 50 pages of reading per week and 20-30 minutes of homework per night on average. AP students are expected to take the AP test in the spring.

United States Government and Politics gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes the study of general concepts used to interpret U S. government and politics along with the analysis of specific examples. Students successfully completing this course will: know important facts, concepts, and theories pertaining to U.S. government and politics; understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences; be able to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to U.S. government and politics; be able to critically analyze relevant theories and concepts, apply them appropriately. This course requires considerable reading and homework outside of class to be successful.

Ethnic Studies

  • SPS Course Number: HSS5082
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester– Grade 10-12
  • Homework: As needed

The Ethnic Studies course focuses on the interdisciplinary study of race, ethnicity, and indigeneity; and on the experiences and perspectives of people of color within and beyond the United States recognizing Native Americans/Alaskan Native, while indigenous, are not ethnic peoples but rather sovereign citizens/descendants of tribal communities. Ethnic Studies engages students in a critical dialogue about intersectional identities, historical perspectives on the roots of oppression, and the social movements that have challenged that oppression. Considered a general elective, does NOT count toward Social Studies graduation requirement.

Psychology

  • SPS Course Number: HSS1058
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10-12
  • Homework: As Needed

Psychology 1 is an introductory course that presents the principles and theories of psychology to students. Knowledge of psychology can help student to understand human behavior and themselves better.

Emphasis in Psychology 1 is on personality development through the study of topics such as biological and environmental influences on behavior, aptitude, human development and maturation, sensation and perception, emotions, motivation, learning and thinking and factors
influencing the quality of a person’s life. Important, too, are topics related to an individual’s mental health such as coping with frustrations and conflict, defense mechanisms, adjustment patterns and psychopathology. Considered a general elective, does NOT count toward Social Studies graduation requirement.

Mathematics Graduation Requirement

  • 3.0 credits (6 semesters)

Required Courses

  • Algebra 1
  • Geometry
  • Algebra 2, IB Math SL Year 1, Financial Algebra, CIHS Bus 130, Modeling our world or a more advanced course in the sequence or an approved CTE math course.

Note: *Students may elect to take an approved third mathematics credit tailored to their career path, to meet the Algebra II graduation requirement. For more information. RCW 284.230.097

Algebra 1 A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HMA2684/HMA2686
  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Materials Required: Scientific Calculator, graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 30 minutes

In this course, students begin with simplifying expressions, solving linear and literal equations and justifying steps using mathematical properties. Next, students engage in a deeper analysis and formalization of functions in context. Students identify and describe function features such as domain and range, increasing and decreasing intervals, and discrete versus continuous. Students represent arithmetic sequences explicitly and recursively using function notation, then evaluate and interpret meaning of solutions within a context. Students build upon their prior knowledge of linear functions to model real-world situations using multiple representations and using multiple forms of linear equations. Students extend properties of exponents to rational exponents and use these properties to create equivalent expressions in both exponential and radical form. Students model and evaluate exponential growth and decay contexts (including geometric sequences) using multiple representations and fluently translate between representations. Students compare and contrast the properties of linear functions with exponential functions.

Other functions covered are absolute value, step, and those that are piecewise defined.

Algebra 1 A/B Modified

  • SPS Course Number: HMA2704/HMA2705
  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Materials Required: Scientific Calculator, graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 30 minutes

Algebra 1 M focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to student IEP goals and objective with modified grading, content, and materials from the general education curriculum. See Algebra 1 course description for more information. By IEP case manager assignment only.

Geometry A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HMA2692/HMA2694
  • 1 Credit/1 year – Grade 9, 10,11,12
  • Materials Required: Scientific Calculator, Compass, Protractor, Ruler, pencils, graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

In this course, students formalize vocabulary definitions and notation. Students write formal proofs of angle and line relationships and triangle properties established informally in prior courses. Students analyze parallel and perpendicular lines on the coordinate plane, establish the slope criteria for parallel and perpendicular lines, and use them to solve problems. Students use geometric tools to make formal constructions of common geometric figures. Students use constructions to explore geometric relationships, concepts, and theorems. Students formalize their understanding of rigid and non-rigid transformations. Students identify and perform transformations of geometric figures on the coordinate plane and in space utilizing construction skills. Students establish congruency of triangles through transformations and establish criteria for triangle congruence (ASA, SAS, SSS). Students write formal proofs to show triangle congruence. Students identify different types of triangles on the coordinate plane by calculating slopes, midpoints, and distances to determine the triangle’s properties. Students develop a formal definition of similarity and establish criteria that can be used to prove two triangles are similar. Students experiment with dilated shapes in space and on the coordinate plane, calculate and use scale factors and proportional relationships to solve for missing information, and apply the properties of similarity to solve real world problems and prove theorems about triangles.

Geometry A/B Modified

  • SPS Course Number: HMA3733/HMA3738
  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Materials Required: Scientific Calculator, Compass, Protractor, Ruler, pencils, graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Geometry M focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content, and materials from the general education curriculum. See Geometry course description for more information. By IEP case manager assignment only.

Algebra 2 A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HMA2688/HMA2690
  • 1.0 credit /Yearlong – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

In this course, students interpret key features of quadratic functions by analyzing equations, graphs, and tables, and use quadratic functions to model situations and solve problems. Students connect prior work with quadratics to understand the parabola as a conic section. Students compare similarities and differences between quadratic and absolute value functions. Students extend their understanding of number to the complex numbers, and find complex solutions to quadratic equations. Students determine the behavior of polynomial functions and identify the key features of higher order polynomial functions by investigating structure/behavior of their graphs and equations. Students apply the Remainder Theorem and utilize factoring, long division or synthetic division to identify the zeros of a polynomial. Students extend their understanding of complex numbers to determine the complex roots of a higher order polynomials. Students solve systems of functions, including polynomial functions, graphically. Students solve equations with rational exponents or radical expressions and identify the properties of radical functions. Students create equivalent expressions using the properties of exponents to solve rational, exponential, or radical equations. Students identify solutions as rational, irrational, and/or extraneous. Students model real-world situations with exponential functions. Students understand the definition of a logarithm as the inverse of an exponential function. Students incorporate the definition of logarithms and properties of exponents to solve equations and interpret solutions within a context. Students extend their knowledge of exponential functions as they model situations with compound interest.

Algebra 2 A/B Modified

  • SPS Course Number: HMA2706/HMA2707
  • 1.0 credit /Yearlong – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Algebra 2A and 2B focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content, and materials from the general education curriculum. See Algebra 2 course description for more information. By IEP case manager assignment only.

Algebra 2 A&B Honors

  • SPS Course Number: HMA2689/HMA2690
  • 1.0 credit /Yearlong – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 45-60 minutes

The distinction between Algebra 2 and Algebra 2 Honors is the pace at which the course moves. SPS is in the process of establishing a district-wide description and definition of Honors level courses. Additional SPS guidance regarding an Honors level course is forthcoming and additional subject matter that will be covered. This course is recommended for students pursuing advanced mathematics.

In this course, students interpret categorical and quantitative data to make inferences and justify conclusions based on statistical simulations, studies, surveys, and experiments. Students estimate population percentiles by analyzing the normal curve. Students gather, summarize, evaluate, and interpret data in order to answer statistical questions. Students assess linear models of bivariate data using residual plots and the correlation coefficient. Students learn to manipulate rational expressions, write rational equations, graph rational functions, and identify key features of rational functions, such as end-behavior, intercepts, increasing, etc. Students revisit the concept of an extraneous solution. Students use factoring and the long division algorithm to rewrite rational expressions, equations, and functions into equivalent forms. Students use the unit circle to define a radian and use symmetry to extend the values of trigonometric functions into all four quadrants. Students determine properties of trigonometric graphs by “unfolding” the unit circle. Students explore sine and cosine functions and their graphs to model periodic situations and explore the effects of transformations on the amplitude, period, and midline of the function.

BUS 130: Business Math A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HMA3866/HMA3867
  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Geometry
  • Edmonds College credits (5) available for $TBD
  • Materials Required:  Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Weekly 30-45 minutes

The course includes instruction and review of basic math functions to prepare students for business classes. Topics may include using ratio-proportion, percent’s, estimating, basic algebra, trade/cash discounts, promissory notes, credit terms, and other consumer related activities.

Pre-Calculus A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HMA2696/HMA2698
  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 2
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 30-60 minutes

Students expand their understanding of functions to include piecewise, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Students use composition of functions to identify and find the inverse of a function. They investigate and identify the characteristics of exponential and logarithmic functions in order to graph these functions and solve equations and practical problems. This includes the role of e, natural and common logarithms, laws of exponents and logarithms, and the solutions of logarithmic and exponential equations. Students investigate and identify the characteristics of polynomial and rational functions and use these to sketch the graphs of the functions. They determine zeros (both real and complex), upper and lower bounds, y-intercepts, symmetry, asymptotes, intervals for which the function is increasing or decreasing, and maximum or minimum points. They deepen their understanding of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students use special triangles positioned within the unit circle to determine geometrically the values of sine, cosine, and tangent at special angles. Students expand their understanding of trigonometric ratios to include secant, cosecant, and cotangent ratios. Students derive the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. They use previous knowledge and apply their understanding of the Pythagorean theorem and oblique triangles to discover these formulas and use them to solve problems. Students model periodic phenomena with trigonometric functions. Students expand their understanding of trigonometric functions to include tangent, secant, cosecant, and cotangent. The inverse trigonometric functions are then used to solve trigonometric equations, evaluate their solutions using technology, and interpret these solutions in the appropriate contexts.

Pre-Calculus Honors

  • SPS Course Number: HMA2697/HMA2699
  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 2 or Algebra 2 Honors
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 60 minutes

The distinction between Pre-Calculus and Pre-Calculus Honors is the pace at which the course moves. SPS is in the process of establishing a district-wide description and definition of Honors level courses. Additional SPS guidance regarding an Honors level course is forthcoming and additional subject matter that will be covered. This course is recommended for students pursuing advanced mathematics.

Students expand their understanding of functions to include piecewise, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Students use composition of functions to identify and find the inverse of a function. They investigate and identify the characteristics of exponential and logarithmic functions in order to graph these functions and solve equations and practical problems. This includes the role of e, natural and common logarithms, laws of exponents and logarithms, and the solutions of logarithmic and exponential equations. Students investigate and identify the characteristics of polynomial and rational functions and use these to sketch the graphs of the functions. They determine zeros (both real and complex), upper and lower bounds, y-intercepts, symmetry, asymptotes, intervals for which the function is increasing or decreasing, and maximum or minimum points. They deepen their understanding of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students studying at the honors level study logistic functions, solve for the zeroes of a polynomial using synthetic substitution, and rewrite rational expressions and solve rational equations. Students use special triangles positioned within the unit circle to determine geometrically the values of sine, cosine, and tangent at special angles. Students expand their understanding of trigonometric ratios to include secant, cosecant, and cotangent ratios. Students derive the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. They use previous knowledge and apply their understanding of the Pythagorean theorem and oblique triangles to discover these formulas and use them to solve problems. Students model periodic phenomena with trigonometric functions. Students expand their understanding of trigonometric functions to include tangent, secant, cosecant, and cotangent. The inverse trigonometric functions are then used to solve trigonometric equations, evaluate their solutions using technology, and interpret these solutions in the appropriate contexts. Students use established trigonometric identities to prove the Pythagorean identities, addition and subtraction identities, and double and half angle identities for sine, cosine, and tangent and use them to solve problems. Students studying at the honors level derive and apply area formulas for oblique triangles, graph harmonic and inverse trigonometric functions, and engage in more complex trigonometric identity proofs.

Pre-Calculus A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HMA2696/HMA2698
  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 2
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 30-60 minutes

Students expand their understanding of functions to include piecewise, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Students use composition of functions to identify and find the inverse of a function. They investigate and identify the characteristics of exponential and logarithmic functions in order to graph these functions and solve equations and practical problems. This includes the role of e, natural and common logarithms, laws of exponents and logarithms, and the solutions of logarithmic and exponential equations. Students investigate and identify the characteristics of polynomial and rational functions and use these to sketch the graphs of the functions. They determine zeros (both real and complex), upper and lower bounds, y-intercepts, symmetry, asymptotes, intervals for which the function is increasing or decreasing, and maximum or minimum points. They deepen their understanding of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students use special triangles positioned within the unit circle to determine geometrically the values of sine, cosine, and tangent at special angles. Students expand their understanding of trigonometric ratios to include secant, cosecant, and cotangent ratios. Students derive the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. They use previous knowledge and apply their understanding of the Pythagorean theorem and oblique triangles to discover these formulas and use them to solve problems. Students model periodic phenomena with trigonometric functions. Students expand their understanding of trigonometric functions to include tangent, secant, cosecant, and cotangent. The inverse trigonometric functions are then used to solve trigonometric equations, evaluate their solutions using technology, and interpret these solutions in the appropriate contexts.

Calculus A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HMA3322/HMA3323
  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 10,11,12
  • Pre-requisite: Pre-Calculus
  • Suggested Fees: Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 60+ minutes

This course begins with a study of some pre-calculus topics
and then moves to a study of introductory calculus. Students study elementary functions,
limits, differential and integral calculus and its applications. It is not the intent of
this course to prepare students for taking the Advanced Placement Calculus Exam.

AP Calculus BC A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HMA1938/HMA1939
  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Grade of A- or better in Pre-Calculus Honors or a B- or better in AP Calculus AB
  • Suggested Fees: Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 60+ minutes

AP Calculus BC A is designed to be equivalent to the first semester of a two-semester college calculus course. AP Calculus BC A has an Advanced Placement designation and qualifies for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point. In this course, students build on prior knowledge to understand the concept of a limit. Students learn techniques for determining limits, and how to evaluate limits for functions that are not continuous. Students consider what an instantaneous rate of change at a point means, and from this develop the definition of a derivative. Students find derivatives of the many function types they have studied in previous courses. They develop a toolbox of methods for determining the derivative of different function types. Students apply derivatives to understand the relationships between position, velocity, and acceleration, and to related rates. Students analyze key features of functions through analyzing their derivatives. Students develop the understanding of an integral through approximation of area and accumulation of change. Students apply the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to integrate functions. Students learn advanced techniques such as integration by parts, using partial fractions, and improper integrals. Out of class exam preparation is expected. Students are expected to take the AP exam, but that exam is not part of the course grade.  By teacher recommendation only.

AP Statistics A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HMA2530/HMA2531
  • 1 credit / 1 year – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 2
  • Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Suggested Fees: Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Materials Required: Graphing Calculator TI-84+ (or equivalent), graph paper or quad ruled notebook, subject specific notebook.
  • Homework: Daily, 60+ minutes

AP Statistics is is designed to be the equivalent of the first half of a one-semester college statistics course and prepares students to take the AP Statistics Exam in May. Students learn how to collect, display and describe data. Students deepen their understanding of probability as it pertains to the role of randomness in data gathering. Students learn to draw conclusions about populations based on the results of a single sample by creating confidence intervals to estimate population values, and conducting hypothesis tests to make decisions.

Basic Math 1 A/B Modified (IEP Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HMA1963/HMA1964
  • 1.0 credit /Yearlong – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Basic Math 1 A/B Modified focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content, and materials from the general education curriculum. Basic math instruction in adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing, with an emphasis on practical application. By IEP case manager assignment only.

Consumer Math 1 A/B Modified (IEP Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HMA1961/HMA1962
  • 1.0 credit /Yearlong – Grade 9,10,11,12
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Consumer Math A/B Modified focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content, and materials from the general education curriculum. Students use math skills to solve consumer problems. These include banking, shopping, transit, and looking for jobs and apartments. By IEP case manager assignment only.

Science Graduation Requirement

  • 3.0 credits (6 semesters)

Required Courses

  • Physics A/Chemistry A
  • Biology Honors
  • Physics B/Chemistry B or Select from approved core course offerings

Note: Students should complete Physics A/Chemistry A and Biology A & B Honors. Physics B/Chemistry B or earn credits in OSPI approved equivalent career and technical education (CTE) courses may be used for the 3rd credit. The third credit may be chosen based on the students’ interest and may include a CTE science-equivalent course RCW.24A.305.130 RCW 28A.700.070 WAC 180-51-068 RCW 28A.230.010

Physics A

  • SPS Course Number: HSC2728
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Student-centered physics curriculum designed to engage students in scientific reasoning and follows a guided scientific model-building approach. It includes units on Charge, Magnetism, and Waves and helps students explain things aren’t directly observable. During each chapter, students are expected to share their previous knowledge, collect and analyze evidence, and develop a conceptual model of each idea.

Chemistry A

  • SPS Course Number: HSC2720
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

In this course, Chemistry A: Atomic Structure and Periodicity, students develop and use models of the atom to investigate the properties of matter at an atomic level and explore how the periodic table provides a way to organize all this information. Students carry out investigations to explain properties of substances and develop solutions to engineering problems of materials science. Finally, students examine the nucleus of the atom and evaluate models to come up with solutions to problems in nuclear chemistry. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging storyline to explain a phenomenon.

Biology A/B Honors

  • SPS Course Number: HSC2712/HSC2716
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Chemistry A, Physics A
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Biology AH: contains 6 units, each built around a real-world phenomenon or problem: System and Scale, Animals, Plants, Decomposers, Ecosystems and Human Energy Systems. Throughout each unit, students share their prior knowledge and ask questions about the unit phenomena. Students carry out investigations and obtain and evaluate information to gather evidence, they analyze and interpret that evidence to make sense of what they are learning and engage in argumentation through discourse to come to consensus about the ideas explored in each lesson. Students create an initial model and then use the evidence they’ve gathered, and ideas discussed as a class to revise that model and eventually construct an explanation of the phenomenon of the unit using their final model. Throughout the storyline of each unit students apply these practices to explore the Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) of Patterns, Energy and Matter, and Cause and Effect.

Biology BH: contains 6 units, each built around a real-world phenomenon or problem: Development, Gene Regulation, Inheritance, Evolution and Population Ecology. Throughout each unit, students share their prior knowledge and ask questions about the unit phenomena. Students carry out investigations and obtain and evaluate information to gather evidence, they analyze and interpret that evidence to make sense of what they are learning and engage in argumentation through discourse to come to consensus about the ideas explored in each lesson. Students create and revise models using the evidence they’ve gathered, and ideas discussed as a class and eventually construct an explanation of the phenomenon of the unit using their final model. Throughout the storyline of each unit students apply these practices to explore the Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) of Patterns, Energy and Matter, and Cause and Effect.

Physics B

  • SPS Course Number: HSC2732
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10,11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Chemistry A, Physics A, Biology A/B Honors
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Physics B is an innovative, student-centered physics curriculum designed to engage students in scientific reasoning and follows a guided scientific model-building approach. It includes units on Energy, Force, and Gravitation and addresses how energy, force, and gravitation can be used to explain the motion of objects. During each chapter, students are expected to share their previous knowledge, collect and analyze evidence, and develop a conceptual model of each idea.

Chemistry B

  • SPS Course Number: HSC2724
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Chemistry A, Physics A, Biology A/B Honors
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

In this course, Chemistry B: Reactions and Energy Transfer, use the basic understanding of the structure of matter to investigate chemical reactions, and to further develop models of matter and energy transfer. Students analyze real world data to develop mathematical models. Finally, students carry out investigations to make sense of every day chemical reactions and processes. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging storyline to explain a phenomenon.

AP Biology 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HSC3012/HSC3148
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Completion of Biology and one year of Chemistry.
  • Suggested Fees: Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Homework: Daily, 30-60 minutes—For each hour of class, there may be up to an hour of homework. In some cases, as with special projects, there may be more.

Advanced Placement Biology is a one-year course which prepares students for the College Board Advance Placement Exam in biology. The course is designed using the materials provided by College Board and is intended to be equivalent to one year of college biology for science majors. STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES (SLO”S) 1. Be able to use laboratory equipment and perform laboratory procedures of the type usually found in first year college biology courses. 2. Be able to demonstrate proficiency in concepts, principles and terminology used in the first year college biology course. 3. Be able to discuss effectively and in depth a wide variety of biological topics as identified in the “Course Description” section of The College Board Advance Placement Course Description. UPON COMPLETION OF THIS COURSE, STUDENTS SHOULD: 1. be able to use laboratory equipment and perform laboratory procedures of the type usually found in first year college biology courses; 2. be able to demonstrate proficiency in concepts, principles and terminology used in a first year college biology course; 3. be able to discuss effectively and in depth a wide variety of biological topics as identified in the “Course Description” section of The College Board Advance Placement Course Description. 4. be prepared to take the college Board AP Examination.

AP Chemistry 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HSC3011/HSC1184
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Biology Honors and Chemistry
  • Suggested Fees: Payment for AP exam, workbooks ($65), test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  •  Homework: Daily, 30-60 minutes—For each hour of class, there may be up to an hour of homework. In some cases, as with special projects, there may be more.

Advanced Placement Chemistry is a semester course that prepares students for the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in Chemistry. The course is designed according to the outline provided by the College Board and is intended to be equivalent to one year of college chemistry for science majors. UPON COMPLETION OF THIS COURSE, STUDENTS SHOULD: 1. be able to use laboratory equipment and perform laboratory procedures of the type usually found in first-year college chemistry courses; 2. be able to demonstrate proficiency in concepts, principles and terminology used in a first-year college chemistry class; 3. be able to discuss effectively and in depth a wide variety of chemistry topics as identified in the “Course Description” section of the College Board Advanced Placement Course Description for chemistry; and 4. be prepared to take the College Board AP examination in chemistry.

AP Environmental Science 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HSC0451/HSC0452
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Biology A/B Honors, Physics B Chemistry B
  • Suggested Fees: Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Homework: Daily, 30-60 minutes –For each hour of class, there may be up to an hour of homework. In the event of special projects, there may be more.

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the inter- relationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The following themes provide a foundation for the structure of the AP Environmental Science course: 1) Science is a process. a) Science is a method of learning more about the world. b) Science constantly changes the way we understand the world. 2) Energy conservations underlie all ecological processes. a) Energy cannot be created; it must come from somewhere. b) As energy flows through systems, at each step it becomes more unusable. 3) The Earth itself is one interconnected system. a) Natural systems change over time and space. b) Biogeochemical systems vary in ability to recover from disturbances. 4) Humans alter natural systems. a) Humans have had an impact on the environment for millions of years. b) Technology and population growth have enabled humans to increase both the rate and scale of their impact on the environment. 5) Environmental problems have a cultural and social context. a) Understanding the role of cultural, social, and economic factors is vital to the development of solutions. 6) Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems. a) A suitable combination of conservation and development is required. b) Management of common resources is essential. Concurrently with ChemB/PhysB w/ teacher permission.

AP Physics C 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HSC2400/HSC2401
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Physics A / Physics B, Calculus. May be concurrent with calculus.
  • Suggested Fees: Payment for AP exam, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Homework: Daily, 30-60 minutes –For each hour of class, there may be up to an hour of homework. In the event of special projects, there may be more.

The AP Physics C: Mechanics courses correspond to approximately a semester of college work. Guided inquiry and student-centered learning is used to foster the development of critical thinking skills, while use of introductory differential and integral calculus pervades the course. First semester AP Physics C: Mechanics provides instruction in each of the following three content areas: kinematics (35%); Newtons laws of motion (40%); work, energy, and power (25%). The AP Physics C: Mechanics courses also include a hands-on laboratory component comparable to a semester-long introductory college-level physics laboratory. Students spend a minimum of 20 percent of instructional time engaged in hands-on laboratory work. Each student completes a lab notebook or portfolio of lab reports. It is expected that each student has a calculus-based college-level textbook (supplemented when necessary to meet the curricular requirements) for individual use inside and outside of the classroom.

Marine Science 1

  • SPS Course Number: HSC3033/HSC3073
  • 0.5 credit per semester (may be taken separately or together. Marine Science 1 is NOT a prerequisite for Marine Science 2) – 10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Phys A/Chem A. Bio A/Bio B
  • Suggested Lab Fee:
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: Daily, 30-45 minutes

Marine Science is the study of the oceans on planet Earth and is aligned to both NGSS standards and the 7 Ocean Literacy Principles (NMEA). The course of study will begin with a brief look at the history of the formation of the earth itself and its geological structures. Marine Science 1 (semester 1) covers the physical understanding of our oceans through a geological and chemical lens. By the end of the first units, students will be able to explain why we can find marine fossils at 7000 feet of altitude and why the seafloor is so much younger than the earth. Students will learn about the structure and properties of seawater and use systems and scale to be able to describe how and why the oceans are the drivers of our climate and ecosystems.

Marine Science 2 utilizes principles of evolution and concepts from the previous semester to build an understanding of life in our oceans. The units start by exploring the smallest of organisms and the processes that drive life on our planet. Following evolutionary trends, students will first study unicellular life in its many forms, then invertebrates and vertebrates, with a lens on adaptation and survival. Finally, students will explore how these populations drive marine ecosystems. The semester ends with a student driven research project and authentic opportunities in the field.

Astronomy 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HSC2379/HSC2380
  • 0.5 credit (1 semester)
  • Grade Level: 10,11,12
  • Prerequisite: Chem A/Phys A, Bio A/Bio B
  • Homework, daily: 30-40 minutes

Students will investigate and learn how to describe star formation, classification, and
evolution of the universe. Students will operate a telescope to find planets, nebulae,
and galaxies at night; evaluate astronomical data to answer questions about space and
planets; and apply modern astrophysics and particle physics principles to understand the
characteristics of galaxies and the universe. Content will include:
Patterns in the sky, Motion of celestial objects, Distances, Ancient astronomy, Matter and energy, Mass and energy, Matter and atomic structure, Light and Properties of light, Telescopes,
Telescope design and optics

Career Connected Learning (CTE) Graduation Requirement

  • 1.0 (2 semesters)

AP Macroeconomics 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HCT2528/HCT2529
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11,12

AP Macroeconomics I is a college level course designed to provide students with a
developing understanding of the principles of economics and how those principles operate
within the economic system as a whole. The course will integrate the role of the
government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. AP Macroeconomics
will emphasize the study of basic economic concepts, economic performance and growth,
the financial sector, and national income. The aim of AP Macroeconomics I is to provide
the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in a typical college
introduction level macroeconomics course. Students will learn to think like economists ?
to question, to evaluate marginal costs and marginal benefits, to explore the many ways
that one action will cause secondary actions.

Business Law 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HCT4265/HCT4266
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9,10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As Needed

This course studies legal principles and practices applied to business situations and transactions. The topics covered are of importance to all citizens, not just business people. Laws of contracts are basic to Business Law including contracts of employment, sales, property, insurance, negotiable instruments, bailments, and marriage. Rather than just read about the law,
students analyze legal cases and apply the law to decisions. They study the organization and functions of the courts, participate in mock trials, and take field trips to the Superior and Municipal Courts. Required for a Statement of Proficiency in Business Management.

Business Management A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HCT4295/HCT4296
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9,10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As Needed

The main objectives are to help students understand and identify the management structures a business can adopt. Identify their individual skills and knowledge needed to be an effective manager. Understand that business management is the use and coordination of all resources in a business. Acquire a foundational knowledge of business and human resources management, information management and organizational practices. Including an understanding of business terminology, concepts, principles and theories. Apply knowledge of ethical business practices to establish and continue business operations, interpreting data, applying appropriate tools and techniques to recommend suitable solutions. Utilize information technology tools to manage and perform work responsibilities. Develop an insight into the management skills necessary for a successful future. Communicate business ideas and information effectively and accurately using appropriate formats and tools.

Introduction to Business

  • SPS Course Number: HCT6146
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As Needed

This course focuses on the general study of business, including the processes of interchanging goods and services (buying, selling and producing), business organization, and accounting as used in profit-making and nonprofit public and private institutions and agencies. Topics of study may include world trade, stock market, housing, banks, finance, ethics, management and global business. 

Career Connections 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HCT/1298HCT1299
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9,10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As Needed

Career Connections 1: Think about it. The average person spends at least 30% of their time each day at work. Finding a career that will satisfy you in your work life is probably high on your list of priorities. The first step in the career search process starts with connecting to a pathway of interest. During this semester long course, you will identify and examine your motivators, dependable strengths, experiences, skills, personality, values, and needs that affect choosing and/or making career and life decisions. Discover your best fit career pathways and design an action plan. Benefits of this course include acquiring marketable skills, exploring career goals, learning to work with others, and gaining self-confidence.

Career Connections 2: This semester long course is designed to teach you the processes and strategies involved with successful career management. Whether you’re contemplating starting a career, trying to choose a career path, or are looking to make changes or improvements to your career goals, this course will provide you with the information you need on your way to achieving success. During Career Connections 2 you will have an internship experience (paid or unpaid) and demonstrate a deeper understanding of worksite learning including branding yourself on social media, interviewing skills, and how to prepare for the first day on the job.

Exploring Computer Science

  • SPS Course Number: HCT2448
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As needed

Exploring Computer Science will develop the computer science skills of algorithm
development, problem solving, and programming. Students will also be introduced to
topics such as interface design, limits of computers and societal and ethical issues of
software engineering. This course is designed for students interested in computing
careers and is a broad introduction to computer science. There are five content areas
in the Exploring Computer Science curriculum: Human Interface Interaction; Problem
Solving; Web Design; Introduction to Programming; and Robotics. Students will learn what
programmers and computer scientists do and how technologists think.

Intro to Programming

  • SPS Course Number: HCT2447
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Completed Algebra 1
  • Homework: As needed

Introduction to Computer Science also known as Creative Computing is a preparatory class in the formal study of computer science and its role in the global world. Course is designed for students who have want to build things.

Computer Science provides students with the skills and knowledge to understand the
technology they use daily and to extrapolate this knowledge to understand and use
emerging technologies. This course is modeled on Level 2 objectives from the Association
of Computing Machinery (ACM) K-12 Computer Science Model Curriculum and will emphasize a
project-based integrated format of lessons that emphasize a way of problem solving and
thinking as a computer scientist. Content areas include: human interface interaction;
problem solving; introduction to programming using Python primarily; and robotics.
Students will learn or build on prior knowledge of what programmers and computer
scientists do and how technologists think.

CSE 142 AP Computer Science A1/A2

  • SPS Course Number: HCT7657/HCT7658
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Algebra 1
  • Suggested Fees:  Payment for AP exam or UW college credit, workbooks, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Homework: 2-3 hours/week. There are 8 programming projects throughout the course, during which this may increase to 4-5 hours.

The entire course covers the fundamentals of CS taught in a first-semester college level course. Students will be able to demonstrate their ability to design, write, analyze, and document programs and subprograms. A large part of the course is the development of computer programs that correctly solve a given problem. These programs should be understandable, adaptable, and when appropriate, reusable. The design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods, and general computer programming problem solving. The current course emphasizes Java programming, programming methodology, and procedural abstraction.

Projects in Computer Science 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HCT5907/HCT5908
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Passing the AP CS A exam, earning a passing grade in UW CSE 142, or permission from the instructor 
  • Homework: As needed

Projects in Computer Science 1 will provide an opportunity for students who have taken
AP Computer Science to undertake a semester-long software development project under the
supervision of the course instructor and local computing professionals (covering
standard C-17 – Implement and manage software). The first half of this course will
focus on software engineering and project management strategies (as outlined in standard
C-12 – Demonstrate project management skills) and standard data structures and
algorithms (C-16 – Develop programs). As students create their products, they will be
responsible for writing documentation and verifying correctness (standard C-18 – “Test
and follow a Quality Assurance Process”).

Graphic Design Beginning

  • SPS Course Number: HCT2543
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As Needed

Graphic Design Beginning is an introductory course that teaches the fundamentals of creatively and effectively communicating through digital images. Employing both traditional and digital tools, students learn graphic design skills, software, and industry standards. Photography Beginning is designed to explore photography as a method of creative visual communication. Students in this course learn basic camera operations and principles of photography such as photo composition, lighting, exposure, and editing. Can fulfill either the CTE or Fine Arts graduation requirement.

Graphic Design Advanced

  • SPS Course Number: HCT2544
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Graphic Design Beginning
  • Homework: As Needed

Graphic Design Advanced emphasizes the development of an individual style and creative approach to design. Students are challenged to grow as independent learners with more complex and open-ended design assignments. Students explore real-world, client-based projects such as Yearbook or promotional materials for the district, school, or class.  Photography Beginning is designed to explore photography as a method of creative visual communication. Students in this course learn basic camera operations and principles of photography such as photo composition, lighting, exposure, and editing. Can fulfill either the CTE or Fine Arts graduation requirement.

Intro to Engineering 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HCT1574/ HCT2314
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As Needed

The first course of the Project Lead the Way (Pre-Engineering) Program is an introductory course, which develops student problem solving skills, with emphasis placed on the development of three-dimensional solid models. Students will work from sketching simple
geometric shapes to applying a solid modeling computer software package. They will learn a problem solving design process and how it is used in industry to manufacture a product. The Computer Aided Design System (CAD) will also be used to analyze and evaluate
the product design. The techniques learned, and equipment used, are state of the art and are currently being used by engineers throughout the United States.

Principles of Engineering 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HCT1576/HCT2311
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Intro Engineering Design and Digital Electronics T&I.
  • Homework: As Needed

This is the third course in the Project Lead The Way (Pre-Engineering) Program and is a
broad-based survey course designed to help students understand the field of engineering
and engineering technology and its career possibilities. Students will develop
engineering problem solving skills that are involved in post-secondary education
programs and engineering careers. They will explore various engineering systems and
manufacturing processes. They will also learn how engineers address concerns about the
social and political consequences of technological change.

Family Health

  • SPS Course Number: HCT7004
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9,10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • 3-4 hours weekly

Family Health is designed to prepare students for life- long decision making, problem solving, critical thinking and management skills related to health and wellness issues impacting individuals and families. This course integrates Washington Health essential learning with standards and competencies from the National Standards of Family and Consumer Sciences Education. The course focuses on the interrelationships of healthy choices and a productive satisfying life. Topics include personal health, wellness, and healthy living, careers, nutrition, growth and development, global, mental, community, environmental and reproductive health, health risks, communication, family living, fitness and safety, first aid; CPR, HIV/Aids and consumer health. Students explore careers in health and medical fields, apply 21st Century skills, obtain certifications and utilize National FCCLA (Family, Career Community Leaders of America student leadership activities to assess learning.

Intro to Medical Careers

  • SPS Course Number: HCT7123
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None

The Intro to Medical Careers course integrates the National Health Science Standards as the core foundation of this course. The course focuses on the interrelationships of career exploration and foundation skills necessary for a career in the Healthcare field. Topics include History and Trends of Healthcare, Personal and Professional Qualities of a Healthcare Worker, Legal and Ethical Responsibilities, Emergency Care, Infection Control, Medical Math, Wellness and Nutrition, Client Status and Medical Terminology. Students apply 21st Century skills and utilize student leadership activities to assess learning. This is a semester long career and technical education course designed as an elective for upper class men students. In this course, students will be asked to apply their understanding of both microbiology and human physiology as well as social and cultural conditions surrounding equity and access to the health care system in order to explore the promotion and protection of community health.

Nutrition and Wellness

  • SPS Course Number: HCT2227
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None

The course focuses
on the practices and early eating and nutritional habits formed through families, paving
the way to lifelong health and well being across the lifespan. Skills gained from the
course content in nutrition and wellness lead to more careful meal planning and choices,
as well as a transfer of knowledge and employability skills to careers in dietetics,
fitness, and all related fields such as food analysis, production, preparation, and
hospitality. Students may earn academic college credit when they complete projects and
assessments related to: nutrition and wellness, management skills and labs, food
safety, science and technology, nutrients, world hunger, life cycle nutrition, energy
balance (physical activity/digestion/metabolism, eating disorders), and careers. The
course may be used in a variety of ways, including a pre-requisite for advanced courses
in Food Production, Careers in Education, Family and Community Services, Human
Development, Child Development and courses in the Health Sciences strand. Family
Health, Independent Living, Personal Choices, or Work and Family Foundations are highly
desired pre-requisite courses. The course is a cross-equivalency for Science.

Photography Beginning

  • SPS Course Number: HCT2536
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: Frequent photo shoots completed outside of class

Photography Beginning is designed to explore photography as a method of creative visual communication. Students in this course learn basic camera operations and principles of photography such as photo composition, lighting, exposure, and editing. Can fulfill either the CTE or Fine Arts graduation requirement.

Photography Advanced

  • SPS Course Number: HCT2537
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Photography Beginning
  • Homework: Frequent photo shoots completed outside of class

Photography Advanced is designed for students interested in expressing their personal creative vision through photography. Students in this course develop their own ideas through open-ended assignments and explore photography as a potential career pathway. This course can be cross credited for Fine Arts. Can fulfill either the CTE or Fine Arts graduation requirement.

Publishing Journalism 1, 2, 3

  • SPS Course Number: HCT7245/HCT7246?HCT7247
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11,12

Pub Journalism 1/2- Students will complete all activities necessary to plan, publish and sell the school’s newspaper. Students will learn basic principles of journalism, layout and design, and
desktop publishing. Utilizing desktop publishing software, students will create newspaper
spreads, articles, advertisements, and information graphics. Students will demonstrate
knowledge of the law and ethics of journalism as well as an understanding of design
style.

Pub Journalism 3 – In addition to enhancing their skills as reporters, designers and producers of the school newspaper, students will take on more of a leadership role. Students also learn more
about the business of and circulation of a newspaper. Students will continue to refine
their skills in principles of journalism, layout and design, and desktop publishing
utilizing desktop publishing software.

Physiology A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HCT3138/HCT3139
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Biomed Science 1, 2.

The course uses leadership projects, applied problems, and research relating to body systems, monitoring, and health conditions. Students will use software to design and build systems to monitor body functions and use research and experiments to lay a scientific foundation for subsequent courses. The course offers 21st Century Skill and HOSA (Future Health Occupations) student leadership opportunities.

Recording Art Tech 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HCT4100/HCT4202
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10, 11,12

A program that prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to the production of sound recordings as finished products or as components of film/video, broadcast, live, or mixed media productions.

Video Beginning A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HCT6146/HCT2453
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester or 1 Credit/Yearlong – 9-12
  • Homework: 1 hour daily; some out of school filming required

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of creatively and effectively communicating visual stories through the lens of a video camera, including critical media analysis. Students collaborate while learning the video production process: pre-production (planning, developing ideas, and identifying resources), production (lighting, composition, and audio recording techniques), and post-production,

(editing with graphics, sound, and visual effects). Types of productions may include narrative, documentary, news, informational, and experimental.

Video Advanced A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HCT2451/HCT2455
  • .5 Credit /1 Semester or 1 Credit/Yearlong – 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Video Beginning
  • Homework: 1 Hour Daily; out of school commitment occasionally required

This is a hands-on, project-based course in which students work in teams to produce a variety of increasingly complex productions. Students refine their understanding of the production process, incorporating more advanced techniques in development, shooting, sound, lighting, editing, graphics and special effects.

Performing & Visual Arts Graduation Requirement

  • 1.0 credits (2 semesters)

Notes: Select from courses in fine, visual, or performing arts or cross-credited CTE courses. 1 credit may be a Personalized pathway requirement WAC 180-50-068. Personalized pathway requirements (2.0 to 3.0 credits) are related courses that lead to a specific post high school career or educational outcome chosen by the student based on the students’ interests and High School Beyond Plan.

Music – Choral

Concert Choir A&B

  • SPS Course Number: CCT7946/CCT7947
  • 1 credit / 1 Year, Grades 9-12
  • Prerequisite: Tenor Bass Choir or Treble Choir. Next course that may follow is Chorale; Vocal Jazz. This course may be repeated for credit.
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

Students in this course participate in an intermediate to advanced choral performing ensemble that performs quality choral literature from a variety of genres and cultures. Students learn vocal technique and musicianship skills. Students perform in school concerts and regional festivals. This course may be repeated for credit.

Chorale A&B

  • SPS Course Number: CCT7944/CCT7945
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Audition
  • Homework:  Required performances; daily practice recommended

Chorale is a year-long course. Students enrolled in Chorale learn appropriate technique, tone, articulation, phrasing and style through the performance of literature from multiple genres and eras. Students learn melodic, rhythmic and harmonic theory as it applies to the concert ensemble. They improve their ability to sight sing. Students utilize habits of a good musician and ensemble etiquette. Semesters 1-2: Students learn beginning vocal technique. Students refine their ability to match pitch and correctly perform rhythms in a piece of music. Students learn solfege syllables and apply it to repertoire. Students learn basic music notation terminology and apply it to music reading. Students practice correct performance etiquette, including timely arrival, supportive audience behavior, and facial and body engagement in performance. Students analyze and evaluate group choral performances from recordings. They are introduced to the concepts to perform in various styles and repertoire appropriate for the ensemble. Semesters 3-4: Students sing with breath energy, support, and good vocal tone. They maintain established tempo of a given piece. Students distinguish and sing stepwise and skipping passages from the written notation. Students visually and aurally distinguish between whole and half steps, understand duple vs. triple meter, and apply this knowledge in their singing. Students identify and perform examples of staccato and legato articulation and accents. Students analyze and evaluate the performances of other choirs and solo artists, using that knowledge to set goals for the ensemble. Semesters 5-6: Students obtain experiences necessary to become musicians in the industry through increased leadership responsibilities, understanding of the roles of all members of the ensemble, and the responsibilities required of all musicians to properly prepare for a variety of performance situations. Students develop skills to select repertoire and suggest appropriate music for various performance situations. Students continue to build skills, including advanced sight-singing and self-assessment. Students expand their grasp and demonstration of correct vocal technique. They demonstrate growth in their ensemble skills by beginning to sing with attention to blend among individual sections and balance between parts. In music literacy, students read/perform/notate/create syncopated rhythm patterns and dotted eighth-sixteenth patterns. Semesters 7-8: Students gain experiences observing and apprenticing with professionals in performing ensembles and deepen their understanding of the expectations of performers/composers/educators in the music industry. Students perform a wide variety of musical styles with high levels of complexity. Students expand their mastery of the voice as an instrument. They gain the skills to identify their own musical strengths and areas of growth. Students demonstrate an appreciation of the various historical aspects of choral music and articulate their appreciation to audiences.

As a preparatory Career and Technical Education (CTE) equivalent course, students demonstrate leadership and employability skills. Students have expanded opportunities to make direct connections to careers as working artists. Course content may include: portfolio development, guest speakers from arts industries, and development of professional responsibility skills such as time management, reliability and punctuality, ability to multi-task and present oneself professionally.

Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit. This course is auditioned and open to students 9-11.

Tenor Bass Choir A

  • SPS Course Number: HFA8114
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester, Grades 9-12
  • Homework: Daily practice recommended

Tenor Bass Choir is open to students who sing in the lower register (tenor and bass) and wish to become better singers and performers. Tenor Bass Choir members learn and perform music in a variety of fun musical styles, from classical to Broadway and pop. Students learn correct vocal technique, music theory, sight- reading, expressive singing, and how to work together to create a dynamic musical performance. Students are encouraged to take choir for all four years of high school. Tenor Bass Choir may be repeated for credit.

Treble Choir A

  • SPS Course Number: HFA 8116
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester, Grades 9-12
  • Homework: Daily practice recommended

Treble Choir is open to students who sing in the upper register (soprano and alto) and wish to become better singers and performers. Treble Choir learns and performs music in the medium-high register voice in a variety of fun musical styles, from classical to Broadway and pop. Students learn correct vocal technique, music theory, sight- reading, expressive singing, and how to work together to create a dynamic musical performance. Students are encouraged to take choir for all four years of high school. This course may be repeated for credit.

Music – Instrumental

Chamber Orchestra A/B

  • SPS Course Number: CCT7492/CCT7943
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Audition or teacher approval
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

Chamber Orchestra is yearlong course for advanced music students who play violin, viola, cello and bass. Instruction in Chamber Orchestra provides the student advanced knowledge in ensemble skills, practice habits, personal musicality, and technique. As a vehicle for skill acquisition, students are introduced to music from a variety of cultures and time periods, work with a conductor, and perform in chamber settings to develop technique and musical leadership. Students practice appropriate rehearsal skills and performance etiquette. They cultivate life-long leadership skills and executive musical skills, including music theory concepts and knowledge of musical composition, arranging, and improvisation. Students learn major/minor scales, chord progressions, intervals, and ensemble etiquette. Students perform in school concerts and regional festivals. Semesters 1-2: Students learn rehearsal skills, performance etiquette and developed playing technique on their instrument that are necessary to perform repertoire appropriate for the ensemble. Semesters 3-8: Building upon skills and knowledge acquired in previous years, students increase their level of musical and technical development on their chosen instrument, gain a greater knowledge of the musical concepts, and deepen their understanding of their role within the ensemble, particularly in the development of leadership skills. Students broaden their understanding of a wider variety of styles, genres, and time periods. Students further hone the skills necessary to self-assess their individual musical and technical progress as well as how they are performing in roles within the ensemble. Students begin to make personal musical decisions that are in alignment with goals of the ensemble.
Semesters 5-8 within the orchestral sequence: In addition to building on skills and knowledge acquired in previous semesters, students engage in career-connected learning through activities addressing management, evaluation, community service, fiscal responsibility, competition, leadership development, personal growth, employability, and career skills, advocacy, and social activities. As a preparatory Career and Technical Education (CTE) equivalent course, students demonstrate leadership and employability skills. Students have expanded opportunities to make direct connections to careers as working artists. Course content may include: portfolio development, guest speakers from arts industries, and development of professional responsibility skills such as time management, reliability and punctuality, ability to multi-task and present oneself professionally. This course may be repeated for credit.

Concert Orchestra A/B

  • SPS Course Number: CCT7948/CCT7949
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: String Orchestra, if offered at school. For programs that have only Concert Orchestra, this is the entry level course. Prior experience playing an instrument supports student success. Next course in the sequence may be Symphony Orchestra; Chamber Orchestra; Eclectic Strings.
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

This year-long performing ensemble is is a performing ensemble that may include woodwind, brass and percussion instrumentation in addition to a core of string students. Students gain intermediate to advanced knowledge in ensemble skills, practice habits, personal musicality, and technique. As a vehicle for skill acquisition, students are introduced to music from a variety of cultures and time periods, work with a conductor, and have the opportunity to perform in chamber settings to develop ensemble technique and musical leadership. Students practice appropriate rehearsal skills and performance etiquette, cultivate life-long leadership skills, and executive musical skills. Skills include music theory concepts and knowledge of musical composition, arranging, and improvisation. Students learn major/minor scales, chord progressions, intervals, and ensemble etiquette. Students perform in school concerts and regional festivals. Attention to fine detail and awareness of their instrument’s role within the ensemble will be taught. Concert Orchestra may be repeated for credit. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements.

Concert Band A/B

  • SPS Course Number: HFA7978/HFA7979
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Homework: Daily practice recommended

Concert Band is a year-long course for students who play traditional woodwind, brass and percussion instruments. Students gain intermediate and advanced knowledge in ensemble skills, practice habits, personal musicality, and technique. Students are introduced to music from a variety of cultures and time periods, work with a conductor, and have the opportunity to perform in a large ensemble setting to develop ensemble technique and musical leadership. Students practice appropriate rehearsal skills, ensemble and performance etiquette, cultivate life-long leadership skills, and executive musical skills, including music theory concepts and knowledge of musical composition, arranging, and improvisation. Students learn major/minor scales, chord progressions, intervals, and tuning from a concert A. Students perform in school concerts, regional festivals and athletic events. Concert Band may be repeated for credit.

Jazz Band A/B

  • SPS Course Number: CCT8096/CCT8097
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Audition only. Audition and/or teacher approval. Next course in the series is Jazz Band Advanced.
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

Jazz Band is a year-long performing ensemble with traditional wind and rhythm section instrumentation. Students enrolled in Jazz Band are expected to participate in all Jazz Band activities during or outside the normal school day, including participation in festivals and trips. Students take the skills and concepts learned in band ensembles and apply them to beginning to intermediate jazz music literature. Students learn and grow as musicians as they increase their individual musicianship and skills as a member of a jazz performing ensemble. Students gain experiences performing jazz in its various styles with its foundation in the concepts of swing. If students cannot acquire their own equipment, equipment will be provided for them. Jazz Band may be repeated for credit. Semesters 1-2: Students learn proper rehearsal skills, performance etiquette and demonstrate proper playing technique on their chosen instrument. Students are introduced to the basic concepts of swing and become fluent in performing appropriate articulation and nuance of swing 8th-notes and quarter notes. The ensemble is introduced to the concepts necessary to perform in various styles including Medium Swing, Latin, Ballad, and Up-tempo Swing. Students develop their individual musicianship and technical skills and their understanding of their role within the jazz ensemble. Students learn the basic concepts necessary to perform an improvised jazz solo.

Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit. This course is auditioned. This course meets before school every day. Students must also be enrolled in an ensemble class during the school day.

Percussion Ensemble

  • SPS Course Number: CCT8102/CCT8103
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Homework: Daily practice recommended

This course may take one of several forms that includes, but is not limited to: a drumline, a marimba ensemble, an African Drum ensemble, a Steel Pan ensemble, or any configuration of pitched and unpitched percussion equipment. Students learn literature from a variety of time periods and cultures with the appropriate technique, instrument specific articulation, phrasing and style. Students perform in school concerts and regional festivals.

Percussion Ensemble Advanced A/B

  • SPS Course Number: CCT8104/CCT8105
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Audition, or instructor approval required.
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

This course may take one of several forms that include but are not limited to: a drumline, a marimba ensemble, an African Drum ensemble, a Steel Pan ensemble, or any configuration of pitched and unpitched percussion equipment. Students learn advanced literature from a variety of time periods and cultures with an emphasis appropriate technique, instrument specific articulation, phrasing and style. This course may be repeated for credit. This course is eligible for Occupational Education which is equivalent to CTE credit. Students may take this course for Occ Ed credit after completing enough semesters of Percussion Ensemble, Percussion Ensemble Advanced, or band courses to fulfill the Fine Arts credit requirement.

Symphonic Band A/B

  • SPS Course Number: CCT8110/CCT8111
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Audition or teacher approval. The next course that may follow is Wind Ensemble, Jazz Band or Jazz Band Advanced.
  • Homework: Required performances; daily practice recommended

The Symphonic Band is a performing ensemble that may include woodwind, brass and percussion instrumentation. Instruction in Symphonic Band provides the student advanced knowledge in ensemble skills, practice habits, personal musicality, and technique. As a vehicle for skill acquisition, students are introduced to music from a variety of cultures and time periods, work with a conductor, and have the opportunity to develop technique and musical leadership. Students practice appropriate rehearsal skills, performance etiquette, cultivate life-long leadership skills and executive musical skills, including music theory concepts, knowledge of musical composition, arranging, and improvisation. Students learn major/minor scales, chord progressions, intervals, and ensemble etiquette. Students perform in school concerts, regional festivals and athletic events. Attention to fine detail and awareness of their instrument’s role within the ensemble will be taught. Symphonic Band may be repeated for credit.

Guitar Lab 1/2

  • SPS Course Number: HFA7958/HFA7959
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As needed

Students in this class learn the basic skills and concepts to gain a rudimentary proficiency performing on a guitar. Students learn correct body posture, how to tune the instrument, and the physical aspect of the instrument. Students learn technical skills including left hand finger exercises, left hand chord formation, strum patterns, and melodic finger picking technique. Students learn to recognize and notate music in tablature, chordal, and traditional note head notation. Students listen to, analyze, and describe music from a variety of genres, which may include Classical, Rock, Folk, and Jazz. Audio and visual examples of guitarists and music from various historical periods and world cultures will be included.  This course may be repeated for credit.

Guitar 2- In this class, advanced finger ability exercises, note reading, chord construction, sight-singing, improvisation, and music theory will be introduced. Students help choose the style/genre of guitar music they wish to study with the instructor. Students listen to, analyze, and describe audio and visual examples of guitarists and music from various historical periods and world cultures in order to broaden their understanding of music in its relation to history and culture. Students gain experience in improvisation and in composing music within specified guidelines. Students perform alone and with others a varied repertoire of music.

Theater

Theatre Beginning

  • SPS Course Number: HFA7872
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As needed

During this course, students are introduced to the foundations of acting including ensemble, concentration, imagination, creative risk taking, and observation. Students develop and refine artistic techniques through the means of creating character, preparing a scene for performance, improvising and devising original stories. Basic stage terminology, staging composition, memorization skills, movement, vocal production techniques, script analysis, audience etiquette, and storytelling forms are covered. Students evaluate works of theatre and learn peer feedback and self-reflection processes.

Theatre Advanced

  • SPS Course Number: HFA7873
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Beginning Theatre or Prior Theater experience
  • Homework: As needed

During this course, students use contemporary and classic theatre scripts to analyze, interpret, and dramatize character objectives, relationships between other characters, and emotional, vocal, and physical traits of character. Students will practice college and professional level directing analysis and blocking notation with scripted and devised scenes and transfer this work into peer-directed performances. Audition preparation includes how to find and cut appropriate material, memorization, building a portfolio with a variety of monologues to showcase acting range, and the professional process of introducing material and making a strong impression. By the end of this course, students have an increased competency in self-confidence, public speaking, and collaboration.

Technical Theatre Beginning

  • SPS Course Number: HFA7936
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester course – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As Needed

This production-oriented course provides a foundation to stagecraft skills and safety procedures preparing students for industry and college study of technical theatre. Students receive an introduction to scenic design and construction, lighting, sound, properties, costumes, make-up, special effects, theatre management, stage management, and theatre terminology. Students actively participate on a crew to mount a production. Throughout the course students engage in problem solving and collaboration. Students research costuming, properties and set pieces in support of historical accuracy or vision of the production. Instructor will guide students in the use of power and hand tools in constructing set pieces, applying special effects, and using a variety of sound and lighting equipment. Costume construction and basic makeup application may be explored. Students shadow the advanced production crews for stage management and/or theatre management including but not limited to: box office, concession, publicity, ushering, and backstage coordination. Behind-the-scenes show experience will be acquired through the school’s production schedule.

As a preparatory Career and Technical Education (CTE) equivalent course, students demonstrate leadership and employability skills. Students have expanded opportunities to make direct connections to careers as working artists. Course content may include: portfolio development, guest speakers from arts industries, and development of professional responsibility skills such as time management, reliability and punctuality, ability to multi-task and present oneself professionally.

Technical Theater Advanced

  • SPS Course Number: HFA7937
  • 1.0 Credit / Year long course – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite:Tech Theatre Beginning
  • Suggested Lab Fee: None
  • Materials Required: Pencils, highlighters, and a notebook/journal.
  • Homework: As Needed

Students in this course will be expected to understand, apply, analyze and assist in the creation of a unifying concept for a production in one or more of the following disciplines: lighting, sound, properties, set construction, special effects, costumes, make-up, theatre management and stage management. Students in this course are take on leadership roles in the production of mainstage shows. As leaders and team members students explore aesthetic criteria to communicate artistic choices through a production. Students participate in the post-production critique for continued improvement of their design skills. While in the course, students connect with working professionals in the field of technical theatre. Students continuing in the class may have the opportunity to create a portfolio demonstrating their knowledge and abilities as a tool for further education and/or employment.

As a preparatory Career and Technical Education (CTE) equivalent course, students demonstrate leadership and employability skills. Students have expanded opportunities to make direct connections to careers as working artists. Course content may include: portfolio development, guest speakers from arts industries, and development of professional responsibility skills such as time management, reliability and punctuality, ability to multi-task and present oneself professionally.

This course is offered as a CTE course which can be cross-credited for Fine Arts. This course is also offered as a Fine Arts credit only.

Theater Playwriting

  • SPS Course Number: CCT7879
  • 1.0 Credit / Year long course – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite:Tech Theatre Beginning
  • Homework: As Needed

This course provides students with an introduction to the art of playwriting. Dramatic writing techniques specific to the stage along with the aesthetics and sensibilities of performance are emphasized. Students learn how playwriting differs from other types of creative writing. Students examine and analyze a variety of works, discussing themes and techniques, from different genres for understanding and inspiration. This examination of theatre literature provides student playwrights with knowledge needed to develop a text for performance in a three-dimensional space. The course provides experience in developing complex characters and writing unique dialogue that motivates the action of a play. Use of main idea, imagery, figurative language, and concrete details are integrated into the writing process. Students learn how to analyze and incorporate theatrical elements of set, sound, and lighting into their writing. Students apply this learning and create original scripts to workshop with peers.

Therater Play Production

  • SPS Course Number: CCT7880
  • 1.0 Credit / Year long course – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite:Theatre Beginning, Theatre Intermediate, or Theatre Advanced and/or audition or teacher approval.
  • Homework: As Needed

During this course is the production of one or more plays. Students rehearse material and learn the processes of producing a professional play with the goal of performing for a public audience. During the rehearsal period students gain a deeper understanding of acting skills and techniques through direct work with a script. Students may be required to be available for after school rehearsals and performances. This course mirrors professional theatre standards, culminating with a full-scale production of a play. Students enrolled in the course may also have opportunities to work in areas of theatre production including directing, scenic design and construction, costuming, properties, promotions and publicity.

Musical Theater Production

  • SPS Course Number: CCT7881
  • 1.0 Credit / Year long course – Grade 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Theatre Beginning, Theatre Intermediate, or Theatre Advanced and/or audition or teacher approval.
  • Homework: As Needed

Students rehearse material and learn the process of producing a professional musical theatre work with the goal of performing for a public audience. During the rehearsal period students gain deeper understanding of acting skills and techniques through direct work with a script. Skills in dance forms, blocking and staging, singing, and ensemble are covered in the course. Students enrolled in the course may also have opportunities to work in areas of theatre production including directing, scenic design and construction, stage management, costuming, properties, promotions and publicity. Students may be required to attend after school rehearsals and performances.

Visual Art

Ceramics Beginning

  • SPS Course Number: HFA8126
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As needed

This beginning course is for students who want to work with their hands and develop ideas in 3-dimensional form. Students work with clay, creating both functional and non-functional art pieces. Students learn the properties of clay, construction methods, glazing techniques, and the firing process as core concepts of this course. Students learn about ceramic arts and artists from a variety of contemporary and historical sources and across cultures. No previous art experience necessary. All students are welcome. This course may be repeated for credit. 

Ceramics Advanced

  • SPS Course Number: HFA8127
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Ceramics Beginning
  • Homework: As needed

In this course, students explore Ceramics at a higher level with hand building and wheel methods. Students design and develop works through investigation of techniques and materials through ceramic arts and artists from a variety of contemporary and historical sources across cultures. Assignments are more complex, challenging students to make deeper connections and use voice to communicate ideas. Students have a portfolio of work at the end of the semester. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.

Drawing and Painting Beginning

  • SPS Course Number: HFA8129
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: As needed

In this course students continue to develop their skills and ideas through investigation of the Elements of Art and Principles of Design and compositional strategies. Students develop a body of work expressing more independence and voice in a range of media, which might include; graphite, pen, colored pencils, pastels, markers, ink, watercolor, acrylic and printmaking ink. Students discuss art from other time periods and cultures to develop a deeper appreciation and understanding of how and why art is made. Students are able to critique their own work and that of peers as part of reflection and responding, to support improving and refining work, using Visual Art specific vocabulary.

Drawing and Painting Advanced

  • SPS Course Number: HFA8129
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Drawing/Painting Beginning
  • Homework: As needed

In this course students continue to develop their skills and ideas through investigation of the Elements of Art and Principles of Design and compositional strategies. Students develop a body of work expressing more independence and voice in a range of media, which might include; graphite, pen, colored pencils, pastels, markers, ink, watercolor, acrylic and printmaking ink. Students discuss art from other time periods and cultures to develop a deeper appreciation and understanding of how and why art is made. Students are able to critique their own work and that of peers as part of reflection and responding, to support improving and refining work, using Visual Art specific vocabulary. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit. 

AP Art and Design A&B
  • SPS Course Number: HFA8132/HFA8133
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Prior experience in 2D art medium strongly suggested
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Payment for AP exam, test prep materials (scholarships available – see your counselor)
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 6+ Hours /Week

The AP Art and Design course presents an inquiry-based approach to learning about art and design. Students conduct in-depth and sustained investigation of materials, processes, and ideas with a self-selected media focus: Drawing, 2D and 3D art. This process supports students to become inquisitive and thoughtful artists and designers. The course continues for a second semester where students develop a portfolio in preparation for AP College Board submission. Students further develop their personal voice in the visual arts as they work in their chosen media or focus.  Student work is developed for a portfolio that will be submitted to the AP College Board for review and scoring. This course is recommended but not limited to students looking to apply to art colleges after high school. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements.  Although there are no prerequisites for the course, prior experience, learning about, and making art, supports student success. This course is eligible for Occupational Education which is equivalent to CTE credit. As an introductory college course, students need to work inside and outside the classroom and beyond scheduled periods. Homework such as a journal or sketchbook, should support the depth of learning expected of AP students. The portfolio exams contain 3 required sections: Selected works (5 works), and sustained investigation (15 digital images) to be submitted as a final, end of course summative assessment, and an artist narrative statement.

Health & Physical Education Graduation Requirement

  • 2.0 Credits (4 semesters)

Required Courses

  • 1.5 Physical Education (select from approved course offerings)
  • .5 Health or Family Health

Note: The performance component of Fitness (physical education) may be waived for specific reasons such as physical disability or other reason described in RCW 28A.230.050. However, the content knowledge requirement must be met by either course work in fitness education or completing the OSPI developed Concepts of Health and Fitness Assessment, which is offered to Seniors students during the 2nd semester of 12th grade only. RCW 28A.230.050; WAC 180-50-135; WAC 392-410-136; WAC 392-410-310; and WAC 392-410-340. PE waivers are not guaranteed.

Family Health
  • SPS Course Number: HCT7004
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9,10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • 3-4 hours weekly

Family Health is designed to prepare students for life- long decision making, problem solving, critical thinking and management skills related to health and wellness issues impacting individuals and families. This course integrates Washington Health essential learning with standards and competencies from the National Standards of Family and Consumer Sciences Education. The course focuses on the interrelationships of healthy choices and a productive satisfying life. Topics include personal health, wellness, and healthy living, careers, nutrition, growth and development, global, mental, community, environmental and reproductive health, health risks, communication, family living, fitness and safety, first aid; CPR, HIV/Aids and consumer health. Students explore careers in health and medical fields, apply 21st Century skills, obtain certifications and utilize National FCCLA (Family, Career Community Leaders of America student leadership activities to assess learning.

Personal Fitness
  • SPS Course Number: HPE2364
  • .5 Credit /1 Semester 9, 10, 11,12

This course will be the first physical education course taken before any elective/choice physical education courses are taken. This high school course will be one of the three (1.5) required physical education classes needed for graduation.

Team Sports 1
  • SPS Course Number: HPE5522
  • .5 Credit /1 Semester 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Personal Fitness

TEAM SPORTS 1 continues the goal setting and fitness measurements while supporting a
record keeping element to analyze personal behavior. The program is customized to meet
individual student’s personal needs and includes a Web-based component that provides
students the opportunity to track and assess their results throughout their tenure in
the district.

Swimming 1/2
  • SPS Course Number: HPE5525/HPE5525
  • .5 Credit /1 Semester 9, 10, 11,12

SWIMMING continues the goal setting and fitness measurements while supporting a record
keeping element to analyze personal behavior. The program is customized to meet
individual students personal needs and includes a Web-based component that provides
students the opportunity to track and assess their results throughout their tenure in
the district.

Weight Training and Conditioning 1/2
  • SPS Course Number: HPE5526/HPE5527
  • .5 Credit /1 Semester 9,10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Personal Fitness
  • Homework: 1 Hour Daily; out of school commitment occasionally required

WEIGHT TRAINING/CONDITIONING 1 continues the goal setting and fitness measurements while
supporting a record keeping element to analyze personal behavior. The program is
customized to meet individual students personal needs and includes a Web-based
component that provides students the opportunity to track and assess their results
throughout their tenure in the district.

Lifetime Activities 1
  • SPS Course Number: HPE5530
  • .5 Credit /1 Semester 9, 10, 11,12
  • Prerequisite: Personal Fitness

LIFETIME ACTIVITIES 1 continues the goal setting and fitness measurements while
supporting a record keeping element to analyze personal behavior. The program is
customized to meet individual students personal needs and includes a Web-based component
that provides students the opportunity to track and assess their results throughout
their tenure in the district. This course aligns curriculum with EALR/GLE’s.
Additional details can be found on the OSPI website under Health and Fitness. This
course will include teaching what all students should know and be able to do in physical
education during LIFETIME ACTIVITIES 1. This curriculum supports Classroom-Based
assessment learning and aligns K-12 curricula.

Personalized Pathway Courses (World Language, Art, Science, etc.)

  • 2.0 to 3.0 credits (4-6 semesters)

Required Courses

  • Select from approved course offerings.

Notes: Personalized pathway requirements are related courses that lead to a specific post high school career or educational outcome chosen by the student based on the students’ interests and High School Beyond Plan.

World Languages are recommended for students planning on attending a 2 or 4-year college or university for admissions purposes. These may be taken as a part of the personal pathway or elective credits.

French

French 1 A&B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL1273/HWL1274
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: Weekly,1-2 hours

French 1 is a two year middle school or one year high school course that introduces
students to French language and Francophone culture. Students learn to carry on a
conversation with a French speaker about self, family, friends, fashion, and fun
activities. Students read and write simple stories and messages in French. They learn
where French speakers live and all they do. The course prepares students to carry on
basic conversations in French and read and write simple sentences about familiar
topics. The course also explores how and where French-speaking people live. Close
attention will be paid to developing communicative skills which focus on listening
comprehension and speaking as well as written expression.

French 2 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3522/HWL3523
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of French 1
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

French 2 is a year-long course that builds upon skills developed in French 1. Students
will learn language skills necessary to survive in a French-speaking country, express
opinions and needs, have conversations in French, and learn how to live like a local in
any French-speaking country. The course prepares students to comprehend and sustain a
conversation about travel and living abroad, health, leisure activities, holidays, and
different ways of life. Students will read materials on topics of personal interest and
derive meaning from selected authentic texts. They will write about familiar topics and
explore how and where French-speaking people live. Close attention will be paid to
developing communicative skills.

French 3 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3526/HWL3527
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of French 2
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2.5 hours

French 3 is a year-long high school course that expands the student?s knowledge of the
French-speaking world through traditional and modern art, literature, and music.
Students will engage in extended conversations, provide and obtain detailed information,
express opinions, feelings, and emotions and more precise nuances on a variety of
topics. The course prepares students to interpret a greater variety of texts and audio
sources and to present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or
readers on a variety of topics. Close attention will be paid to increasing precision in
expressing and understanding language via the use of homonyms, synonyms, tentative
expressions. Students will increase familiarity with the history of the Francophone
people, and demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practices,
products and perspectives of Francophone people.

AP French 5 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3534/HWL3535
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of French 3 or teacher recommendation
  • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours

AP French 5 is a one-year high school course that emphasizes contemporary issues of
global importance. The course prepares students to read about and view current events
in the French-speaking world. They will discuss and present a variety of viewpoints,
defending and justifying their opinions about the various issues. Close attention will
be paid to developing substantive arguments and negotiating to reach consensus.


Japanese

Japanese 1 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL1275/HWL1276
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

Japanese 1 is a year-long, two semester high school course that introduces students to
the Japanese language. Students show their understanding by using Japanese correctly in
speaking, reading, writing, and listening activities. The course prepares students to
develop their speaking and writing skills to meet the communication needs of real-life
situations using Japanese. Students not only improve their communication skills in
Japanese, but also develop critical thinking skills along with a deeper appreciation of
Japanese culture and of the cultural diversity in the world.

At the conclusion of this course students will be able to ask and answer questions,
carry on simple conversations, express simple opinions and needs, read and write short
paragraphs, gain knowledge and understanding of Japanese culture.

Japanese 2 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3541/HWL3542
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Japanese 1
  • Suggested Lab Fee: Student workbook fees vary
  • Materials Required: Workbook
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

Japanese 2 is a year-long course that builds upon skills developed in Japanese I.
Students learn language skills necessary to survive in Japan, express opinions and
needs, have conversations in Japanese, and learn how to live like a local in any
Japanese community. The course prepares students to comprehend and sustain a
conversation about travel and living abroad, health, leisure activities, holidays, and
different ways of life. Students will read written materials on topics of personal
interest and derive meaning from selected authentic text. They will write about
familiar topics and a variety of lifestyles in Japan. Close attention will be paid to
developing communicative skills. At the conclusion of this course students will be able
to initiate and sustain conversation on familiar topics with pronunciation that does not
interfere with communication; ask and answer a variety of questions with justification;
express opinions, feelings and needs, providing solutions to problems; comprehend main
ideas of selected authentic audio recordings, broadcasts and video and understand
selected authentic written text by reading 100 – 130 KANJI and writing 50 – 80 KANJI;
write short paragraphs, stories, skits, and dialogues on familiar topics (up to 100
words); gain knowledge and understanding of Japanese culture.

Japanese 3 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3545/HWL3546
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Japanese 2 with C or better or teacher recommendation
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

Japanese 3 is a year-long, two semester course that enables students to read 300 kanji
and write 150 KANJI. Students will engage in extended conversations, provide and obtain
more detailed information, express feelings and emotions more precise nuances, and
exchange more detailed opinions on a variety of topics. The course prepares students to
interpret a greater variety of texts and audio sources and to present information,
concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics. Close
attention will be paid to variance in language use of homonyms, synonyms, tentative
expressions. Students will increase their understanding of the history of the Japanese
people, and demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practices,
products and perspectives of Japanese people.

At the conclusion of this course students will be able to comprehend simple statements
and respond to simple commands and questions on the basis of learned materials; express
ideas and some details in phrases and sentences on a variety of topics; comprehend main
ideas and some supporting details from simple narratives and materials, such as menus,
notes and schedules; write/compose short messages, notes and simple guided paragraphs;
identify, use, and compare/contrast some common social conventions, social courtesies
and gestures in predictable everyday situations.

AP Japanese Language & Culture 5 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3553/HWL3554
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Japanese 4 or teacher recommendation

Japanese 5 AP is a one year high school course that emphasizes contemporary issues of
global importance. The course prepares students to read about and view current events
in the Japan and Asia. They will discuss and present a variety of viewpoints, defending
and justifying their opinions about the various issues. Close attention will be paid to
developing substantive arguments, and negotiating to reach consensus.

At the conclusion of this course, students will ask and respond to a wide variety of
questions with elaboration and substantiation of opinion; carry on extended
conversations with active and spontaneous input; discuss or debate a wide variety of
topics from the local to the international level; read a wide variety of authentic
texts, analyzing the authors style and perspective; write research papers on topics of
interest related to the Japanese people; explain how history and culture affect opinions
and viewpoints of people in Japan and Asia; explain and understand views of Japan and
its people by other nations; understand Japan?s impact on world politics, economics and
history.


Spanish

Spanish 1 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL1279/HWL1280
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours 

This Course allows students to develop basic proficiency in the four skills of communication: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Content includes vocabulary common to daily needs, knowledge and use of formal and informal register, basic grammatical structures, comprehension of familiar topics, development of, sensitivity to, and an acceptance of cultural differences. Students are expected to actively participate in class, memorize vocabulary, and practice grammar outside of class.

Spanish 2 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3560/HWL3561
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 1
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

Spanish 2A is the first part of a year-long high school course that builds upon skills
developed in Spanish 1. The course prepares students to comprehend and sustain a
conversation about self, family, friends, interests, daily routine, health, school,
travel and personal history. Students will read written materials on topics of personal
interest and derive meaning from selected authentic text. They will write about
familiar topics and explore how and where Spanish-speaking people live. Close attention
will be paid to developing communicative skills. At the conclusion of this course
students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on familiar topics with
pronunciation that does not interfere with communication; ask and answer a variety of
questions with justification; express opinions, feelings and needs, providing solutions
to problems; comprehend main ideas of selected authentic audio recordings, broadcasts
and video and understand selected authentic written text; write short paragraphs,
stories, skits, and dialogues on familiar topics (up to 150 words); gain knowledge and
understanding of Spanish-speaking culture.

Spanish 3 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3564/HWL3565
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 2
  • Homework: Weekly, 1-2 hours

Spanish 3A is a year-long course in which students engage in extended
conversations, provide and obtain more detailed information, express feelings and
emotions with more precise nuances, and exchange more detailed opinions on a variety of
topics. The course prepares students to interpret a greater variety of texts and audio
sources and to present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or
readers on a variety of topics. Close attention will be paid to enhance communicative
skills and enrich language production by using circumlocution, idiomatic expressions,
questioning to elicit information, and deriving meaning through context. Students will
demonstrate a deeper understanding of the relationship between the practices, products
and perspectives of Spanish-speaking people.

Spanish 4 A&B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3566/HWL3567
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 3
  • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours

Spanish 4A is a year-long course that helps students develop and express opinions, debate meaningful issues, read or write in the Spanish language, and watch and understand Spanish media. The course prepares students to carry on complex and extended conversations in Spanish, read and write narrative, persuasive, and analytic essays, and to engage with the Spanish-speaking culture. Close attention will be paid to refining all communicative skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

At the conclusion of this course students will express opinions about topics discussed
and make recommendations; present information though speeches and longer compositions;
understand formal and informal presentations in Spanish spoken by native speakers;
analyze and evaluate practices and products of the Spanish-speaking culture.

AP Spanish Language & Culture 5 A/B 
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3572/HWL3573
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 4 or teacher recommendation
  • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours 

Spanish 5 APA is the first part of a one-year high school course that emphasizes
contemporary issues of global importance. The course prepares students to read about
and view current events in the Spanish-speaking world. They will discuss and present a
variety of viewpoints, defending and justifying their opinions about the various
issues. Close attention will be paid to developing substantive arguments and
negotiating to reach consensus. At the conclusion of this course, students will ask and
respond to a wide variety of questions with elaboration and substantiation of opinion;
carry on extended conversations with active and spontaneous input; discuss or debate a
wide variety of topics from the local to the international level; read a wide variety of
authentic texts, analyzing the author?s style and perspective; write research papers on
topics of interest related to the Spanish-speaking world; explain how history and
culture affect opinions and viewpoints of people in the Spanish-speaking world.

Spanish 103 Spanish 3 A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL7678/HWL7679
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 3 or teacher recommendation
  • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours 

SPANISH 3A is the first part of a year-long course in which students engage in extended conversations, provide and obtain more detailed information, express feelings and emotions with more precise nuances, and exchange more detailed opinions on a variety of topics. The course prepares students to interpret a greater variety of texts and audio sources and to present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics. Close attention will be paid to enhance communicative skills and enrich language production by using circumlocution, idiomatic expressions, questioning to elicit information, and deriving meaning through context. Students will demonstrate a deeper understanding of the relationship between the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish-speaking people. At the conclusion of this course students will be able to initiate and engage in conversation on familiar topics with more spontaneity; ask and answer a variety of questions with justification; express opinions, feelings and attitudes using appropriate vocabulary; understand both in and formal authentic audio recordings, broadcasts and video; use knowledge of Spanish language structure to derive meaning from a variety of authentic written text; write organized, coherent pieces incorporating a variety of details and description using both simple and complex sentence structures (up to 200 words); acknowledge, compare, and discuss the practices, beliefs and perspectives of Spanish-speaking cultures; identify, use, and compare and contrast some common social conventions, social courtesies and gestures in everyday situations. The Spanish 3 curriculum is guided by a set of rigorously vetted course objectives that span the formation of simple structures to more complex sentence structure and word choice to creatively describe a variety of topics and situations.

Spanish Heritage Speaker A/B
  • SPS Course Number: HWL3577/HWL3578
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9-12
  • Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 4 or teacher recommendation
  • Homework: Weekly, 2-3 hours 

Spanish for Heritage Speakers is a year-long course that supports, reinforces, and
expands student knowledge of their own tongue. Because students understand at least the
rudiments and structure of the language and have a working vocabulary, (to a greater or
lesser extent), this course often moves faster than other Spanish courses. It will
emphasize literary development (with a study of literature and composition). This course
will also include culture and history of the variety of Spanish-speaking cultures.
Students will learn translation skills. Students will demonstrate a deeper understanding
of the relationship between the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish-speaking
people.

Annual Staff

  • SPS Course Number: HLA0219
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10-12
  • Materials Required: None
  • Homework: 1-2 hours per week

This course emphasizes publication techniques of selecting and editing both written and pictorial copy. It provides experiences in writing captions and headings. Stress is placed on group discussion, organizing and the basic essential skills of book production of a yearbook. Considered a general elective, does NOT count toward ELA graduation requirement.

Art Survey

  • SPS Course Number: HFA8059
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester– Grade 9-12

Students gain an understanding of the Elements of Art and Principles of Design as employed in their work. Student practice communicating an idea through works of art by using media, methods, and concepts. Projects may include but are not limited to printmaking with linoleum blocks and transfers, cardboard construction and surface design, jewelry design, as well as more conventional drawing and painting. In addition, students may experience a variety of methods, processes, and media in 2 and 3-dimensional art forms including: Drawing where students develop skills in line, shape, value, form, texture, and color.  Painting with different mediums: tempera, watercolor, acrylic, oil sticks, pastels, and mixed media. Graphic Design and Illustration, Sculpture, Applied Arts/Craft, Printmaking, Digital Media and Design. Students learn the proper use, care and storage of art materials and learn to explore creative use of media and tools in their work. Students make connections to the Historical and Cultural aspects of the visual arts and develop an understanding of different forms of personal expression. Students develop vocabulary and observation skills to react, respond and reflect to different forms of the visual arts, and participate in judgment, assessment/evaluation in group discussions and individual critiques on the merits of different forms of visual arts.

College Prep Literacy

  • SPS Course Number: HLA2305/HLA2306
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9-12
  • Homework: As needed

This course is designed is designed to enable high school students to sharpen academic reading and writing skills in preparation for college, career, and life. This course will focus on improving reading comprehension through skill development, increasing understanding of narrative and expository text structures, including academic reading, functional reading, informational reading and technical reading, in order to learn more effectively from subject-matter textbooks in Science, History/Social Studies, Math and English. Students will be introduced to narrative and expository organizational patterns, as well as the academic language used, and the integration of reading and writing in the aforementioned classes. Frequent progress monitoring is implemented to ensure growth and acceleration. Content covered in this course is based upon student needs, and teachers select the appropriate materials. Considered a general elective, does NOT count toward ELA graduation requirement.

Ethnic Studies

  • SPS Course Number: HSS5082
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester– Grade 10-12
  • Homework: As needed

The Ethnic Studies course focuses on the interdisciplinary study of race, ethnicity, and indigeneity; and on the experiences and perspectives of people of color within and beyond the United States recognizing Native Americans/Alaskan Native, while indigenous, are not ethnic peoples but rather sovereign citizens/descendants of tribal communities. Ethnic Studies engages students in a critical dialogue about intersectional identities, historical perspectives on the roots of oppression, and the social movements that have challenged that oppression. Considered a general elective, does NOT count toward Social Studies graduation requirement.

Leadership

  • SPS Course Number: HUE1407
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9-12

This class is a leadership learning laboratory that supports and challenges students to develop the habits of citizenship, service, ethical leadership, and the ability to think and act on behalf of
the common good. It focused not only on developing lasting leadership capacity, but on touching the hearts of youth, encouraging them to live and act from their values, and feel
empowered to make the world a better place.

Music Survey

  • SPS Course Number: HFA7998
  • 1 Credit / 1 Year – Grade 9-12

his one-semester course is open to all students interested in learning the basics of music theory and music history. Students learn skills and concepts to gain rudimentary proficiency in reading music. Students listen to, analyze and describe music from a variety of genres, which may include popular, folk, classical, world music, and jazz. Students explore compositional techniques. Discussion of non-Western music traditions may also be included.  

Psychology

  • SPS Course Number: HSS1058
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 10-12

Psychology 1 is an introductory course that presents the principles and theories of psychology to students. Knowledge of psychology can help student to understand human behavior and themselves better.

Emphasis in Psychology 1 is on personality development through the study of topics such as biological and environmental influences on behavior, aptitude, human development and maturation, sensation and perception, emotions, motivation, learning and thinking and factors
influencing the quality of a person’s life. Important, too, are topics related to an individual’s mental health such as coping with frustrations and conflict, defense mechanisms, adjustment patterns and psychopathology. Considered a general elective, does NOT count toward Social Studies graduation requirement.

ELD WA State History (Multilingual Learners Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HSS2198
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester– Grade 9-12

Focus on history, geography, government of WA State from the time of the Native Americans to contemporary times.

Washington State History – Modified (IEP Only)

  • SPS Course Number: HSS9233
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9-12

Washington State History Modified focuses on specially designed instruction aligned to students’ IEP goals and objectives with modified grading, content, and materials from the general education curriculum. The purposes of the course are to improve literal and inferential comprehension skills, vocabulary, reading rate, reading related study skills, and interest in reading. Curriculum is based on students’ IEP goals and objectives as well as modified general education curriculum and content.  By IEP case manager assignment only.

Learning Lab

  • SPS Course Number: HUE2290
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9-12

Students eligible for Special Education Services will receive specially designed
instruction designated in their IEPs in reading, math, written expression, and behavior.
Needed skills will be taught using large group, small group and individualized
instruction. Supplementary instruction will be provided utilizing various computer
assisted instructional packages. Credit will be elective, but IEP teams can count the
class as a Language Arts or Math credit if they determine that this is appropriate.

Life Skills

  • SPS Course Number: HUE9245
  • 0.5 Credit / 1 Semester – Grade 9-12

The main emphasis is the development of skills all students will need to use in their adult life. It concentrates on communication skills, writing skills, reading skills, analysis skills, conflict resolution, family finances and household budgeting, and planning skills. The students will develop social skills used at the work site and in the family unit.